Single-nucleotide polymorphism identification and genotyping in Camelina sativa – R. Singh, V. Bollina, E. E. Higgins, W. E. Clarke, C. Eynck, C. Sidebottom, R. Gugel, R. Snowdon, I. A. Parkin – Molecular Breeding 2015

David Roberts Camelina Breeding 0 Comments

Summary: Camelina sativa, a largely relict crop, has recently returned to interest due to its potential as an industrial oilseed. Molecular markers are key tools that will allow C. sativa to benefit from modern breeding approaches. Two complementary methodologies, capture of 3′ cDNA tags and genomic reduced-representation libraries, both of which exploited second generation sequencing platforms, were used to develop …

Camelina as a sustainable oilseed crop: Contributions of plant breeding and genetic engineering – J. Vollmann, C. Eynck – Biotechnology Journal February 2015

David Roberts Camelina Biotechnology 0 Comments

Summary: Camelina is an underutilized Brassicaceae oilseed plant with a considerable agronomic potential for biofuel and vegetable oil production in temperate regions. In contrast to most Brassicaceae, camelina is resistant to alternaria black spot and other diseases and pests. Sequencing of the camelina genome revealed an undifferentiated allohexaploid genome with a comparatively large number of genes and low percentage of …

Bees love those pretty yellow camelina flowers

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Researchers have found winter-grown camelina works very well as a forage resource for bees combing for nectar on sparse ground in early spring. Scientists with the United States Department of Agriculture planted pennycress, canola and camelina to see how bees responded to their early spring blooms. “All three cover crops had high insect visitation during their anthesis periods,” says a …

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Camelina resists 5 common insect pests of canola

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A team of Saskatoon researchers has found that Camelina seems to naturally resist 5 common insect pests that often plague the Canola crop. The study, published in The Canadian Entomologist, found that Camelina suffered little feeding damage from various crucifer-feeding flea beetles, root maggots or diamondback moths. Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada researchers reported that diamondback moths laid fewer eggs on Camelina …