Molecular Diagnostic Tools for Detection and Differentiation of Phytoplasmas Based on Chaperonin-60 Reveal Differences in Host Plant Infection Patterns – T. Dumonceaux, M. Green, C. Hammond, E. Perez, C. Olivier – PLOS One 2014

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Summary: Phytoplasmas (‘Candidatus Phytoplasma’ spp.) are insect-vectored bacteria that infect a wide variety of plants, including many agriculturally important species. The infections can cause devastating yield losses by inducing morphological changes that dramatically alter inflorescence development. We describe a method for accessing the chaperonin-60 (cpn60) gene sequence from a diverse array of ‘Ca.Phytoplasma’ spp. The oligonucleotide-coupled fluorescent microsphere assay revealed …

A New Report for Downy Mildew [(Hyaloperonospora camelinae Gäum.) Göker, Voglmayr, Riethm., M. Weiss & Oberw. 2003] of Camelina [Camelina sativa (L.) Crantz] in the High Plains of the United States – Harveson, R. M., Santra, D. K., Putnam, M. L., Curtis,

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Summary: Camelina was recently introduced into North America, where it is currently grown commercially in Montana and North Dakota. During early June 2010, camelina plants from cultivar research trials began exhibiting downy mildew-like symptoms consisting of upper stem distortion and signs of white, fluffy masses covering stems, seed pods and heads. More investigation is warranted to determine whether these observations …

Feeding behavior of a potential insect pest, Lygus hesperus, on four new industrial crops for the arid southwestern USA – S.E. Naranjo and M.A. Stefanek – Industrial Crops and Products 2012

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Summary: The objectives of this study were to establish baseline data on the feeding behavior and potential impact of L. hesperus on camelina, guayule, lesquerella and vernonia. Results show that L. hesperus will readily feed on the economically important tissues of all crops, and although previous research has shown that this feeding did not consistently affect lesquerella yield, further work …

Regional variation in Brassica nigra and other weedy crucifers for disease reaction to Alternaria brassicicola and Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris – A.L. Westman, S.Kresovich, and M.H. Dickson – Euphytica 1999

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Summary: In this study we evaluated 24 Eurasian crucifer species for disease reaction to North American isolates of the crop pathogens A. brassicicola and X. campestris pv. campestris. The test array comprised 190 entries (genebank accessions and weed populations), including 108 B. nigra entries from four geographic regions and 34 entries of Camelina sativa. Link: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1023%2FA%3A1003544025146

Variation in Resistance of Camelina (Camelina sativa [L.] Crtz.) to Downy Mildew (Peronospora camelinae Gäum.) – J. Vollmann, S. Steinkellner, and J. Glauninger – Journal of Phytopathology 2001

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Summary: An important low-input feature of camelina is its high level of resistance against plant diseases, which may partly be due to the production of antimicrobially efficient phytoalexins. In Central European countries such as Austria, downy mildew (Peronospora camelinae) is the only disease of camelina which has been found repeatedly, whereas other diseases and pests have been observed only occasionally. …

New sources of resistance to Sclerotinia sclerotiorum for crucifer crops – M.B. Uloth, M.P. You, P.M. Finnegan, S.S. Banga, S.K. Banga, P.S. Sandhu, H. Yi, P.A. Salisbury, and M.J. Barbetti,- Field Crops Research 2013

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Summary: Effective host resistance to S. sclerotiorum is urgently needed if Sclerotinia rot is to be successfully managed across diverse oilseed, forage and vegetable crucifer crops worldwide. While this study highlighted individual genotypes that offer great potential for improving resistance to Sclerotinia rot in commercial cruciferous crops, it also demonstrated that assessment of the overall value of a species is …

Susceptibility of Brassicaceous Plants to Feeding by Flea Beetles, Phyllotreta spp. (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) – J. Soroka and L. Grenkow – Journal of Economic Entomology 2013

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Summary: Multiple laboratory and field feeding bioassays were conducted to determine the susceptibility of a wide range of crucifer species, cultivars, and accessions to feeding by flea beetles with the goal of discovering sources of resistant germplasm. The results indicate possible sources of resistance to Phyllotreta flea beetles, while highlighting the complicated roles that glucosinolates may play in Phyllotreta host …

Effects of crop rotations and tillage on Pratylenchus spp. in the semiarid Pacific Northwest United States – R.W. Smiley, S. Machado, J.A. Gourlie, L.C. Pritchett, G.P. Yan, and E.E. Jacobsen – Plant Disease 2013

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Summary: There is interest in converting rainfed cropping systems in the Pacific Northwest from a 2-year rotation of winter wheat and cultivated fallow to direct-seed (no-till) systems that include chemical fallow, spring cereals, and food legume and brassica crops. The density of Pratylenchus spp. was greater in cultivated than chemical fallow, became greater with increasing frequency of host crops, and …

Camalexin induction in intertribal somatic hybrids between Camelina sativa and rapid-cycling Brassica oleracea – M. A. Sigareva and E. D. Earle – Theoretical and Applied Genetics 1999

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Summary: Camelina sativa, a wild relative of Brassica crops, is virtually immune to blackspot disease caused by Alternaria brassicicola. Intertribal somatic hybrids were produced between C. sativa and rapid-cycling Brassica oleracea as a step toward the transfer of resistance to this disease into Brassica vegetable crops. Resistance was correlated with the induction of high levels of the phytoalexin camalexin 48h …