Oil-seed crop: Camelina sativa – J. Zubr – Industrial Crops and Products 1997

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Summary: Recent search for new sources of essential fatty acids, particularly OMEGA-3 fatty acids, led to a renewed interest in the crop camelina. The cultivation of the crop is characterized by a low input. Nitrogen demand is moderate to low and chemical plant protection is not needed. The environmental benefits of the crop and a multipurpose applicability of the oil …

Camelina sativa, a climate proof crop, has high nutritive value and multiple-uses: a review – E.A. Waraich, Z. Ahmed, R. Ahmad, M.Y. Ashraf, Saifullah, M.S.Naeem, and Z. Rengel – Australian Journal of Crop Science 2013

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Summary: In this paper an overview of Camelina sativa as an alternative oilseed crop is discussed in detail as well as how it can be potentially utilized for food, feed and industrial purposes. Link: http://www.highbeam.com/doc/1P3-3150379811.html

Camelina – will this emerging biodiesel benefit biodiversity? – E. Small -Biodiversity Vol 14 No. 2 2013

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Summary: Camelina is today one of the most promising biofuel crops that are being developed to alleviate concerns over the use of fossil fuel. Concomitantly, camelina has become part of the debate over the risks and benefits of bioenergy based on cultivated crops. In this article, issues associated with camelina production with special regard to biodiversity impacts, are discussed. Link: …

The Biology of Canadian Weeds. 142. Camelina alyssum (Mill.) Thell.; C. microcarpa Andrz. ex DC.; C. sativa (L.) Crantz. – A. Francis and S. I. Warwick – Canadian Journal of Plant Science 2009

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Summary: This paper summarizes biological information on three cruciferous weed species: Camelina alyssum, C. microcarpa and C. sativa. C. sativa has attracted renewed interest as an oil crop, because of an adaptation to various climatic conditions, low nutrient requirements and resistance to diseases and pests. In Europe, where it is now widely grown, it has shown considerable potential in the …

New high quality oil seed crops for temperate and tropical Australia – C. M. Francis and M. C. Campbell – RIRDC Australia 2003

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Summary: To gain an understanding of the genetic variation in Camelina, thirty-two lines, grown in a common garden situation during the winter of 2001, were assessed for a number of characteristics. Link: http://www.extsoilcrop.colostate.edu/CropVar/documents/oilseeds/alternative_oil/oilseed_crops_for_australia.pdf

Camelina (Camelina sativa) – C. Eynck and K Falk – In: Biofuel Crops: Production, Physiology and Genetics (ed: B. P. Singh) – CAB International, Wallingford, U.K. 2013

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Summary: This book chapter provides a literature review on the topics camelina history, biology, agronomics and breeding. Furthermore, it covers the potential of camelina as feedstock for the production of biofuels and discusses the political, social and environmental issues associated with the production of biofuels from camelina. In summary, the prospects of developing improved germplasms/cultivars of camelina are promising. Link: …

Factors Affecting the Composition and Use of Camelina – J.G. Crowley and A. Fröhlich – Teasgasc Crops Research Centre 1998

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Summary: A three year study established that camelina is a very suitable crop to grow in Ireland, producing 2.5 t/ha of high quality seed (42-47% oil) with no agrochemical inputs required. The oil contains 35 to 40% linolenic acid compared to 8% in rape and soya oils. The oil does not deteriorate during refining or storage and can be used …